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Writing My Book: How to Write Your Single Book into a Wildly Successful Book Series

How to Write Your Single Book into a Wildly Successful Book Series

Are you planning to write just one book? Wait! Before you decide, at least let me show you how easy it is to make your single book into a series of books. By the way, publishers love book series and readers become fanatical over a serial of books.

Begin to change your thinking. Don’t look at your book as a one time thing or a one title event. Begin to look at it as the beginning of your successful author journey. If you are looking for an easier journey, more rewards and more profits with a series of books, follow the tips below:

1. Slash your huge book into separate books. The easiest way to do this is to separate your book into chunks, chapters, sections and parts. Writing this way will allow you to divide and conquer. You can easily take the chunks or sections and divide them into several books. Your readers will love that you made your book such an easy read and buy each one of them.

2. Put your overflow information into a second book. Gather all the overflow research material. You know all the extra information discovered that wouldn’t fit into your first book. Put it in order and develop it into a separate book. For example, if one of your chapters is becoming bloated with information overload consider marking it for book two. There’s no better time to start collecting information for book two than when you are organizing book one.

3. Poll your readers for a key point they want to know more about. Expound on a point your readers show interest in knowing more about. If you don’t know already, try to discover their problems and write the solutions in the next book. Handle this well and your sequel may sell better than the previous book.

4. Select a sub-topic to do further research. Do more research on one of your book’s sub-topics. Take a sub-topic that you only touched on in the first book and cover if fully in the sequel. Your readers will love the additional information and anticipate buying the next volume.

5. Write a companion book for the original book. You can excerpt sections from your first book, insert groups of checklists, discussion or reflection questions and voila you have a study guide or workbook.

6. Develop a meditation or journal book. Gather quotes related to your book’s topic and pair them with excerpts from your original book to put in a meditation book or devotional. Or create a journal with quotes from your original books in the corner of each lined page of the journal. You can number them according to weeks, days or lessons. For example, 52 weeks of inspiring thoughts or 365 days of inspirational thoughts from your book’s topic.

7. Repurpose your material for a different audience. Plan another edition of your book for a different audience than the original book. Remember the Chicken Soup for Teen-Agers, Prisoners, Mothers and so on sold better than the original Chicken Soup for the Soul. The original book was for a more general audience. Find out how you can target your audience even more and you may discover a better selling market within a general market.

If you don’t change your thinking, your book could end up being a tiny drop in the scheme of life. Instead plan a wildly successful series of books and make the splash you’re destined to make. You may feel you can’t dream that big. No worries; start with the simple tips above. Expand your thinking. Dream a bigger dream and write your single book into a plethora of books. I look forward to seeing your name in print many times.

About the Author

Earma Brown, 12 year author and business owner helps small business owners and writers who want to write their best book now! Earma mentors other writers and business professionals through her monthly ezine “iScribe.” Send any email to iscribe@bookwritinghelp.com for free mini-course “Jumpstart Writing Your Book” or visit her at How to Write a Book.

http://www.bookwritinghelp.com/

Writing and Publishing My Book: The Curse of Writer’s Block

The Curse of Writer’s Block

Writer’s Block. A curse well known to anybody that has ever been required to put quill to ink, pen to paper or, in keeping with technology, finger to keyboard. The sudden phenomenon that comes out of nowhere like a falling piano and lampoons all efforts at creativity when it is specifically required.

The most common cause is a simple lack of inspiration yet the curse can also be linked to depression and anxiety, mood disorders caused by changes in the brain’s frontal lobe. A widely held belief is that the sudden ceasing of ideas and creativity is all part of the natural ebb and flow of the process. It could also be claimed that it is a result of trying to pin down something elusive and free in the same way that a comedian who, upon discovery of their trade, is beseeched “go on then, tell us a joke.” Ask a writer to give a thousand words on a set subject and the words will flow, ask a writer to give twenty on a subject of their own choice and sooner or later the well runs dry.

Henry Roth is perhaps the most famous sufferer of writer’s block. Roth’s first novel “Call It Sleep” was published in 1934 and was regarded as a depression-era masterpiece. After beginning and aborting his second novel, Roth was struck with the dreaded Writer’s Block and worked as a firefighter, a teacher, a labourer and anything that didn’t require him to write before retiring. His second novel “Nature’s First Green” was eventually published in 1979. Roth’s block was due to a combination of depression, an unwillingness to confront the problems of his past and, strangely, political problems.

Widely-acclaimed film makers the Coen brothers also suffered under the curse of Writer’s Block whilst working on a screenplay for their prohibition-era film “Millers Crossing.” A dark and twisting story of gangsters and corruption revolving around a femme fatale, “Millers Crossing” is certainly a great film yet when Joel and Ethan Coen hit a block they decided to make an art of Writer’s Block. More specifically, they wrote a film, “Barton Fink,” about a writer of social realist plays whose creative juices run dry when he is called up to Hollywood to draft a script about a wrestler. The result? “Barton Fink” won the coveted Palme d’Or atthe Cannes festival by unanimous vote and awards for Best Director and Actor.

For most writers afflicted by the terrifying Block a clean sweep of Cannes’ top three awards is unlikely. So it needs to be overcome, easier said than done, right? There are some strategies for battling the Block. Tike time to write and work and write no matter what, regardless of the quality. The writing muscle needs to be exercised like any other and the more you practice the more will flow easily.

If, as commonly opined, Writer’s Block comes from a lack of inspiration or new ideas, do something unusual. Take a journey, go to the Zoo, take a drive, just leave your desk and something will spark off a fire of creativity. Alternatively, simply go somewhere and don’t write. Take a couple of days off and relax, let your mind un-clutter and return to that empty page with a clear mind. Fresh air is a great healer. When getting away from your desk don’t just move to another chair, go for a walk. Get some exercise and oxygenate your brain. Walking is one of the widest practice cures for the Block and you never know what or who you’ll see while you do it.

Whatever you do, don’t give up, or try writing about Writer’s Block, it’s already been done and done well. Don’t lose faith, if you do run out of original and creative ideas you can always join the writing team for an American sitcom instead.

About the Author

Patrick is an expert travel researcher and writer currently researching Manchester Airport Parking, Bristol Airport Parking and Glasgow Airport Parking (http://www.holidayextras.co.uk/glasgow-airport-parking.html)

Welcome!

Well, everything needs to start somewhere…

While I’ve been coaching and helping people for about 15 years now to write and publish their books ~ to bring their dreams to life ~ this website is only now getting a life of its own…

I look forward to getting to know you as we go on this journey together…

As my first project for this site, I’ve been asked to create an inspirational journal that I’m calling “365 Days of Inspiration” and I will take you step-by-step in this blog along with me so you can see each element in the process.

If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out and say hello.

Wishing you a truly magical evening!

Talk soon…

Leigh