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How to Create Your Amazon Author Profile Page

amazon-author-profile-pageDo you have an Amazon Author Profile Page?

I know first-hand how frustrating it is when I want to find other books by an author I really like, only to find their author page doesn’t exist, or that it only contains a couple of their published works and I need to go hunting to find others…

Help existing and potential readers get to know you by bringing everything into the one place on your Amazon Author Profile Page, listing everything you have published (with direct links to be able to buy them), showing them your photos, telling them who you are, providing them with feeds to your blogs, videos, and even a calendar of your events.

Your Amazon Author Page is your opportunity for your readers to get to know you, so make sure you include any details about your background, any awards or competitions you have won, other books you have written, and personal details you want to share.

You will need an author photo and while it doesn’t need to be professionally created, it should be recent and of a high-enough resolution quality display.

Adding Your Book to Your Amazon Author Profile Page

Make sure every book you have written appears in your bibliography.  To add books:

  1. Go to the Author Central Books tab and click Add more books.
  2. In the Search field, enter the book title, ISBN, or author name and click Go.

Once you’ve found the missing book, click This is my book below that book.

Adding and Changing Information on Your Amazon Author Profile Page

Adding or changing the information is easy. Below is a list from the Amazon site – if you would like more information, click here to go direct to their help page:  https://authorcentral.amazon.com/gp/help?topicID=200649520

  • Biography
    • Adding or Editing a Biography
    • Deleting a Biography
  • Photos
    • Adding Photos
    • Moving or Removing a Photo
  • Blog Feeds
    • Adding a Blog Feed
    • Removing a Blog Feed
  • Events
    • Adding Events
    • Editing Event Information
    • Removing an Event
  • Videos
    • Adding Videos
    • Moving or Removing a Video
  • Twitter Feeds
    • Adding your Twitter Feed
    • Editing your Twitter Name
    • Removing your Twitter Feed
  • Author Page URL
    • Creating your Author Page URL
    • Share your Author Page URL on Twitter & Facebook
    • Use your Author Page URL in your Email Signature

As always, if you need any support or assistance, please reach out!

By Leigh St John

Book & Writing Competitions – March 2016 Deadlines

Writing Competitions with deadlines in March 2016

writing competitionYou’ve written your book – you may have even worked with us to turn your book into an Amazon best-seller – but either way, it’s still important to continue to promote your book and to get it in front of people…

An excellent way to do that is by entering your book into writing competitions.

Below you will find a list of competitions of all sorts, varieties and genres that have deadlines in March, 2016.


 

Poetry and Short Fiction Competition

http://www.brittlestar.org.uk/competition-2/    March 1, 2016    The first poem/story submitted costs £4.50. Subsequent entries in the same submission cost £3.50 per poem/story. Brittle Star subscribers (including those subscribing at time of submission) get one free second entry

Humanities Writing Competition

http://www.girton.cam.ac.uk/undergraduates/for-schools/humanities-writing-competition        March 11, 2016.                This competition is an opportunity for research and writing beyond the curriculum using one or more of the six objects as your focus. Essays or creative responses (such as dramatic monologues or short stories) are equally welcome. We are looking for the ability to connect different areas of knowledge, to think about details and to communicate clearly.

CWA MARGERY ALLINGHAM SHORT STORY COMPETITION

http://thecwa.co.uk/debuts/short-story-competition/                March 1, 2016.   The competition is open to all – both published and unpublished authors- and is for short stories of up to 3,500 words. All that we ask is that the story has not been previously published so whether you polish off a dusty draft or craft a brand new idea is totally up to you.

The Caterpillar Poetry

http://www.thecaterpillarmagazine.com/a1-page.asp?ID=7254&page=13             March 31, 2016.     “The name of the author must not appear on the same page as the poem. It’s not a requirement, but we strongly advise you to purchase a copy of The Caterpillar. Entries must be in English, typed, with each entry on a new sheet. Entries will not be returned, so make sure you keep a copy. No corrections can be made after receipt, or fees refunded.”  ”    Milltown Belturbet Co. Cavan Ireland”

Hugh Miller Writing Competition

http://www.scottishgeology.com/hughmiller/    March 18, 2016.       Entries are invited that are inspired by the geological and landscape writings of Hugh Miller, Scotland’s celebrated self-taught geologist. As a poet and prolific writer, the wealth of potential inspiration that Miller provides in his work is worthy of widespread public engagement. We hope that this writing competition, open to all ages, will encourage both a renewed interest in Miller’s work, a catalogue of new writings inspired by one of Scotland’s greatest nature writers and greater awareness and appreciation of Scotland’s geodiversity. – See more at: http://www.scottishgeology.com/hughmiller/#sthash.jlqASIEL.dpuf

L. Ron Hubbard’s Writers of the Future Contest

http://www.writersofthefuture.com/enter-writer-contest/                March 31, 2016 L. Ron Hubbard’s Writers of the Future Contest is an opportunity for new and amateur writers of new short stories or novelettes of science fiction or fantasy. No entry fee is required. Entrants retain all publication rights.   “7051 Hollywood Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90028”

Cork Literary Review Poetry Manuscript Competition

http://www.dystopianstories.com/writing-competitions-2016/     March 7, 2016    The prize includes the publication of a first poetry collection by the winning author and twenty free copies of the book. The overall competition winner and two runners-up will also be featured in the next edition of the prestigious Cork Literary Review.  “50 Pope’s Quay Cork City T23 R6XC”

2016 Nelligan Prize for Short Fiction

http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/nelligan-prize/submission-guidelines/                March 14, 2016 “The story title and your name, address, phone number, and e-mail address should be entered in the cover letter field, separate from your story. Be sure your name is not anywhere in the story itself (for example, in the header or footer). The fee to enter online is $17 ($2 goes to the good people at Submittable; in most cases, it will be less expensive to enter online than by mail, but we have no preference regarding how you enter).”              “9105 Campus Delivery Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523-9105”

2016 Book Award

http://www.ruberybookaward.com/      March 31, 2016 The Rubery Book Award is the longest established book award based in the UK for independent and self published books. The key to our success is having a keen eye for quality from distinguished and reputable judges.     PO Box 15821, Birmingham, B31 9EA, United Kingdom.

Antonym Poetry Contest

http://www.fanstory.com/contestdetails.jsp?id=102502 March 31, 2016 Write a poem with the following format. A four line poem. The first line is only one word. Second and third line can be formatted as you wish. The last line is the antonym of the word on the first line. Words that are opposite or nearly opposite in meaning are called antonyms. Examples are big and small, or long and short.

Cozy Mystery Novels Writing Contest 2016

https://chantireviews.com/services#!/Cozy-Mystery-Novels-Writing-Contest/p/21521076/category=5193080                March 31, 2016 “Novels may be Self-published, Indie Published or Traditionally Published. E-pubbed Novels with ISBN/ASIN designation will be accepted in the published division. All published novels must have ISBN/ASIN designation. Entries must be in the English language. No erotica. No graphic violence, please. We are looking for true cozy novels.”

2016 Stella Kupferberg Memorial Short Story Prize

http://www.selectedshorts.org/extras/writing-contest-2/                March 15, 2016 Entries should be 750 words or less. (We sometimes have technical difficulties with our word count in the online form. If the counter reads a number higher than 750, but the text is under 750, you will still be able to enter the form and it will be read. If you have problems with this function, please contact us.)       “2537 Broadway New York, NY 10025-6990”

Connemara Mussel Festival Poetry Competition 2016

http://www.connemaramusselfestival.com/poetry-competition.html             March 13, 2016.                The competition theme  is “Mussels”. While the poem does not have to be about mussels, it must contain some reference to the mussel.

Wyoming Writers, Inc.

http://www.wyowriters.org/      March 15, 2016 You still have a few months to play with images, tales and words, but Wyoming Writers, Inc. encourages you to plan to submit your haiku, true fiction, villanelle, screen play, or real life tales to the 2016 writing contest. WW, Inc. will soon solicit your work for the 2016 writing contest in the five categories: Adult fiction (including short stories, excerpts from longer works and screen plays), Fiction for Children and Young Adult, Nonfiction, Free Verse Poetry and Traditional Poetry.              “PO Box 1287 Green River, WY 82935”

Writers-Editors Network 33rd Annual International Writing Competition

http://www.writers-editors.com/Writers/Contests/Contest_Guidelines/contest_guidelines.htm          March 15, 2016 The contest is open to all writers. You do not have to be a member of Writers-Editors Network (WEN). However, members of our Network (which includes FFWA) save up to 50% on entry fees. (If you’re submitting more than one entry, it probably will save you money to join at least at the Basic level – PLUS, you get all that information for a full year!)   PO Box A, North Stratford NH 03590

Glass Mountain Submission

https://glassmountain.submittable.com/submit March 4, 2016    “We accept fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, art, and everything in between – surprise us!  Acceptable formats for each genre can be found in its category. · We accept submissions year-round, though we do not read during the summer break. · All submissions must include the following information: author’s/artist’s name, phone number, email, and genre. Please include author’s/artist’s name on every page of the work in the header. · In your cover letter, be sure to include a brief bio (about 50-100 words), written in third-person, to tell us about you and any previous publications.” “University of Houston Department of English Houston, TX 77204”

POETRY 2016 International Poetry Competition

http://www.atlantareview.com/page6.html        March 1, 2016                “Poems must be your original creative work, not published in a national print publication. (Online or local publication is permitted, as long as you hold the copyright.)”

2016 NFSPS Annual Poetry Contest

http://www.nfsps.com/poetry_contests.htm      March 15, 2016 “Any poem submitted must: Be the original work of the contestant, unpublished in any form, including electronically and placed on exhibition, not under consideration or accepted for publication.”

No Way Out Fiction Competition

http://creativecompetitor.com/creative-writing-competitions/creative-writing-competitions-2016/no-way-out-fiction-competition-march-2016/              March 30, 2016.                “You must be aged 18 or over Open to writers worldwide – Maximum word count is 700 including the title – Submissions must be original and previously unpublished – You may enter multiple submissions providing the correct fees are paid  – You must enter on or before the closing date – Submissions must be written in English – We welcome imaginative interpretations of the theme”

The  “Nivalis” Short Story Competition 2016

http://www.fabulapress.com/the-contest/          March 31, 2016                “Stories must be not less than 1500 words and no more than 7,000 words in length. There is no limit to the number of entries per person, but this is not bingo, and more submissions do not necessarily translate into higher chances of winning.”

Howard Frank Mosher Short Fiction Prize

http://hungermtn.org/contests/howard-frank-mosher-short-fiction-prize/    March 1, 2016    The Howard Frank Mosher Short Fiction Prize (HFMSFP) is an annual contest for short fiction. It is a chance for your fiction to be read by Hunger Mountain editors and guest judges!   “36 College Street Montpelier, VT 05602”

Ruth Stone Poetry Prize

http://hungermtn.org/contests/ruth-stone-poetry-prize/              March 1, 2016    Ruth Stone Poetry Prize is an annual poetry contest. It is a chance for your poems to be read by Hunger Mountain editors and guest judges.     “36 College Street Montpelier, VT 05602”

DASH Journal’s Poetry Contest

http://www.dashliteraryjournal.com/#!poetry-contest/c1qev     March 1, 2016    DASH Journal welcomes submissions to its annual poetry contest. Send up to 3 unpublished poems per entry (max 33 lines each). The writer of the best poem will win a cash prize of $1,000 plus publication. “800 N. State College Blvd. Fullerton, CA 92831”

F(r)iction Winter Literary Competition

http://tetheredbyletters.com/submissions/contest-submissions/                March 1, 2016    BL is pleased to announce the F(r)iction Winter Literary Competition. There are three submission categories: 1) short stories of any genre ranging from 1,000 to 7,500 words, 2) flash fiction with a word limit of 750 words, and 3) poetry no longer than three pages.      “13999 County Road 102 Elbert, CO 80106”

The Southeast Review’s Writing Contests

http://southeastreview.org/contests/    March 15, 2016 Send up to three poems, no more than 10 pages total, accompanied by a $16 reading fee for mailed or online submissions. Include no more than one poem per page. Include your name, contact information (email address preferred), and the title of each of your poems in a very brief cover letter. Do not include personal identification information on the poems themselves.            “Florida State University Tallahassee, FL 32306”

World’s Best Short-Short Story Contest

http://southeastreview.org/contests/    March 15, 2016 Send up to three short-short stories per submission, accompanied by a $16 reading fee for mailed or online submissions. Each short-short story should be no more than 500 words. Include your name, contact information (email address preferred), and the title of each of your short-short stories in a very brief cover letter. Do not include personal identification information on the short-shorts themselves.       “Florida State University Tallahassee, FL 32306”

The Southeast Review Narrative Nonfiction Contest

http://southeastreview.org/contests/    March 15, 2016 Send one piece of nonfiction, no more than 6,000 words total, accompanied by a $16 reading fee for mailed or online submissions. Include your name, contact information (email address preferred), and the title of your submission, and the total word count of your piece (new this year) in a very brief cover letter. Do not include personal identification or information, except word count, on the submission itself.              “Florida State University Tallahassee, FL 32306”

Willow Springs Fiction Prize

http://willowsprings.ewu.edu/contests.php        March 15, 2016 Willow Springs, a contemporary literary magazine, is accepting entries for its fiction prize. Submit only original, unpublished work. There is no word limit for submissions. The winner will receive a prize of $2,000 plus publication.   “668 N. Riverpoint Blvd 2 RPT -#259 Spokane, WA 99202-1677”

Phoebe Journal’s Writing Contest

https://phoebe.submittable.com/submit              March 31, 2016 Phoebe, a journal of literature and art, is accepting submissions of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. A finalist in each category will receive a cash prize of $500 plus publication. Submit a prose piece of up to 5K words, or 3-5 poems totalling no more than 10 pages.

The Grammar Ghoul Press Writing Contest

http://www.grammarghoulpress.com/writing-contest/  March 13, 2016.     Short Stories: 1000-3500 words; Flash Fiction: 100-1000 words.

Streetlight’s 2016 Essay/Memoir Contest

http://streetlightmag.com/essaymemoir-contest/            March 23, 2016.     Please do not submit previously published work. Simultaneous submissions are fine, but please notify us immediately if a piece is accepted elsewhere. Submissions cost $10.

Tanka Poetry Contest

http://www.fanstory.com/contestdetails.jsp?id=102482 March 25, 2016 A tanka poem usually only has one stanza. But we are keeping the format open You can submit a traditional tanka poem or you can include additional stanzas. If you include additional stanzas they must follow the tanka format as specified above.

FanStory’s Write About This Contest

http://www.fanstory.com/contestdetails.jsp?id=102440 March 13, 2016 Write a short story that somehow includes the image pictured. The image must somehow be part of your story. The story can be about anything as long as the image shown in this annoucement is a part of it. Minimum length 700 words. Maximum Length 7,000 words. Recommended length 2,000 – 3,500 words

2016 TUSCULUM REVIEW POETRY CHAPBOOK PRIZE

http://web.tusculum.edu/tusculumreview/contest/                March 1, 2016    The Tusculum Review, an annual literary journal, is accepting entries for its poetry chapbook prize. Each chapbook manuscript entered should consist of 20-30 pages of poems. No more than one poem may appear on a page. “P.O. Box 5113 60 Shiloh Road Greeneville, TN 37743”

The 2016 Pinch Literary Awards

http://www.pinchjournal.com/2016-contest-guidelines/ March 15, 2016 All entries are considered for publication. First, second, and third place winners will be selected from each category. The first place winners will be published in the Spring issue following announcement. Second and third place winners will be given high-priority consideration for publication, but because of space, cannot be guaranteed. Due to the high volume of submissions, any prize-winners will be ineligible for contest participation for three years.

Connemara Mussel Festival Poetry Competition

http://www.connemaramusselfestival.com/2015/poetry-competition.html             March 13, 2016 “The competition theme  is “Mussels”. While the poem does not have to be about mussels, it must contain some reference to the mussel. Maximum length:  51 lines.”

CUTTHROAT Literary Award

http://www.cutthroatmag.com/contest.html     March 15, 2016 Submit up to three unpublished poems (100 line limit each), one unpublished short story or creative nonfiction piece (5000 word limit), any subject, any style, postmarked BY OCTOBER 20, 2016.

Hunger Mountain Creative Nonfiction Prize

http://hungermtn.org/contests/creative-nonfiction-prize/                March 1, 2016    An annual contest for the best writing in the boundless field of creative nonfiction. A chance for your creative nonfiction to be read by Hunger Mountain editors and guest judges.      “36 College Street Montpelier, VT 05602”

Katherine Paterson Prize

http://hungermtn.org/contests/katherine-paterson-prize/           March 1, 2016    Any writer – residing in any country or U.S. state – is eligible to enter; Hunger Mountain and VCFA staff and currently enrolled students are ineligible. “36 College Street Montpelier, VT 05602”

William Van Dyke Short Story Prize

http://www.ruminatemagazine.com/submit/contests/fiction/    March 15, 2016       “The submission deadline for the short story contest is March 15, 2016. The entry fee is $20 (includes a free copy of the Winter 2016/2017 Issue, international entries will receive a complimentary PDF copy). You may submit one story per contest entry fee and it must be 5500 words or less. There is no limit on the number of entries per person.”

Women’s Short Story Competition 2016

https://mslexia.co.uk/competition/short-story-competition/#    March 14, 2016       It’s that time of year again when our Women’s Short Story Competition is open for business! As always, the 2016 competition welcomes writers of all levels of experience, writing stories on any subject – in any style.            PO Box 656, Newcastle upon Tyne NE99 1PZ

THRESHOLDS INTERNATIONAL SHORT FICTION

http://blogs.chi.ac.uk/shortstoryforum/features-competition/                March 6, 2016    THRESHOLDS is the only online forum dedicated to the reading, writing and study of the short story form. One overall winner will be chosen, followed by two runners-up.

The Rubery Book Award

http://www.ruberybookaward.com/enter-the-book-awards.html              March 31, 2016 “We accept books and ebooks but please do not send both unless requested to do so. There is no publication date restriction. We accept fiction (all genres), young adult, children’s, biographies, non-fiction, self-help, cookery, poetry, photography etc. There are no limits on the type.”           “PO Box 15821 Birmingham B31 9EA UK”

Hourglass Literary Magazine Contest

http://hourglassonline.org/contest/       March 31, 2016 “The winning entry in each category (short story, essay and poem) will receive US$1000 as prize money, apart from a symbolic artifact (clepsydra), digital stamp and diploma. Winning entries will be published in the first issue of the Hourglass Literary Magazine, in the original language (English / BCMS languages) and translated (BCMS/English). Authors will also receive three printed copies of the first issue of the Hourglass Literary Magazine.”

Brittle Star Poetry and Short Fiction Competition

http://www.brittlestar.org.uk/competition-2/    March 1, 2016       The first poem/story submitted costs £4.50. Subsequent entries in the same submission cost £3.50 per poem/story. Brittle Star subscribers (including those subscribing at time of submission) get one free second entry. Narrative Winter 2016 Story Contest       http://www.narrativemagazine.com/winter-2016-story-contest March 31, 2016       Our winter contest is open to all fiction and nonfiction writers. We’re looking for short shorts, short stories, essays, memoirs, photo essays, graphic stories, all forms of literary nonfiction, and excerpts from longer works of both fiction and nonfiction. Entries must be previously unpublished, no longer than 15,000 words, and must not have been previously chosen as a winner, finalist, or honorable mention in another contest.

Penguin Design Award

http://penguinrandomhousedesignaward.co.uk/submissiondetails.php  March 6, 2016                Standout cover design is an integral part of the success of a book and Penguin Random House has created thousands of iconic book covers throughout the years. The vital role of illustrators and designers in the production of some of the world’s best-loved adult and children’s books has created and defined the identity of our UK publishing lists.

The Inaugural “Write This Speculative Fiction Novel” Contest

http://www.realmwalkerpublishinggroup.com/the-1st-annual-write-this-speculative-fiction-novel-contest/ March 15, 2016 The contest takes a story ripped out of today’s headlines and challenges writers from all over the world to write a speculative fiction story based upon it. We look to something potentially horrific to launch this contest in this article about the discovery of “pandoraviruses” being found in the Siberian permafrost.

Milt Kessler Poetry Book Award

http://www.binghamton.edu/english/creative-writing/binghamton-center-for-writers/binghamton-book-awards/kessler-guidelines.html March 1, 2016    Milt Kessler Poetry Book Award, sponsored by the creative writing program at Binghamton University, recognizes an outstanding collection of poems published in the previous year. The winning author receives a cash prize of $1,000. “P.O.Box 6000, Binghamton, NY13902-6000”

McLaughlin-Esstman-Stearns First Novel Prize

http://www.writer.org/get-involved/apply-for-fellowships-writing-contests          March 11, 2016 We welcome submissions from writers of all genres, backgrounds, and experiences in the following genres: fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Emerging Writer Fellows will be featured at The Writer’s Center as part of a special celebration and reading. Fellows living within a 250-mile radius of the center will receive a $250 honorarium, and all others will receive $500.                “4508 Walsh St.

Bethesda MD 20815”

Lexi Rudnitsky Editor’s Choice Award

https://perseabooks.submittable.com/submit/35654      March 7, 2016    Held annually in memory of poet Lexi Rudnitsky (1972-2005), the Editor’s Choice Award is open to any American with at least one previous collection of poems. The winner receives publication and $1,000 + $1,000 stipend toward expenses associated book promotion (e.g. travel to/from readings).

The 2016 Knickerbocker Prize

http://www.bigfictionmagazine.com/writers_guidelines/              March 15, 2016 We welcome simultaneous submissions, but please notify us immediately if your work is accepted elsewhere. Only previously unpublished work can be considered. We will accept fiction of any genre (except children’s), as long as it has clear literary intent. Translations are welcome. International submissions in English are also welcome.

The Basil Bunting Poetry Award

http://www.ncl.ac.uk/ncla/competitions/bunting             March 7, 2016    The Basil Bunting Award poetry competition is open internationally to any poet writing in English. Each poem should be no longer than 40 lines.

The Bryan MacMahon Short Story Competition

http://writersweek.ie/competitions/      March 3, 2016    Here at Listowel Writers’ Week we recognize the determination and commitment of all writers through our annual international creative writing competitions. The struggle to express one’s creativity through the written word is not an easy one. Once written, those precious words then face adjudication by those who read what has been penned as their author anxiously awaits the outcome. We encourage you to try and we will laud and rejoice with you in your success.

The Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition

http://www.ncwriters.org/our-members/network-news/7351-sarah-rose-nordgren-to-judge-2016-randall-jarrell-poetry-competition          March 1, 2016    The Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition accepts one-poem submissions. The contest awards the winner $200 and publication in storySouth.

Fish Publishing Short Story Prize

http://www.fishpublishing.com/short-story-competition-contest.php     March 17, 2016       The Fish Short Story Prize is an established event on the literary calendar. Previous judges, Roddy Doyle and Colum McCann are honorary patrons.

The Stella Kupferberg Memorial Short Story Prize

http://www.selectedshorts.org/extras/writing-contest-2/                March 15, 2016 The Stella Kupferberg Memorial Short Story Prize is a writing competition sponsored by the stage and radio series, Selected Shorts. This long-running series at Symphony Space in New York City celebrates the art of the short story by having stars of stage and screen read aloud the works of established and emerging writers. Selected Shorts is recorded for Public Radio and heard nationally.              “2537 Broadway New York, NY 10025-6990”

2016 Innovative Short Fiction Contest

http://coniumreview.com/contests/innovative-short-fiction-contest/                March 1, 2016    Innovative short fiction should take risks that pay off. Don’t tell us a story we’ve already heard before. Show us something new with your subject, style, or characters. Make sure your writing has a “wow” factor.

Connemara Mussel Festival Poetry Competition

http://www.connemaramusselfestival.com/2015/poetry-competition.html             March 13, 2016 Building upon the diversity of arts and culture already catered for at the festival, the Connemara Mussel Festival is delighted to announce the launch of  a  poetry competition for 2016.

Jabberwock Review Prizes in Fiction and Poetry

http://www.jabberwock.org.msstate.edu/           March 15, 2016                Jabberwock Review invites submissions to the Nancy D. Hargrove Editors’ Prizes in Fiction and Poetry. Deadline: March 15, 2016. Each winner (one for fiction and one for poetry) receives $500 and publication in Jabberwock Review. All finalists are considered for publication. The entry fee of $15 includes a one-year subscription, beginning with the prize issue. Simultaneous submissions welcome.         “Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS 39762”

2016 GLCL Sonnet Contest

http://www.readwritelive.org/2016-glcl-sonnet-contest.html      March 15, 2016 Great Lakes Commonwealth of Letters (GLCL), in cooperation with the Kalamazoo Book Arts Center (KBAC), is thrilled to announce our 2016 GLCL Sonnet Contest with final judge Keith Taylor. The winning sonnet will be celebrated with a uniquely designed broadside by KBAC, while three honorable mentions will be invited for publication on GLCL’s Fresh Ink blog.               “758 Wealthy Street SE Grand Rapids, MI 49503”

2016 Short Story Award

https://sites.google.com/site/bethlehemwritersroundtable/short-story-contest March 31, 2016       “We will begin accepting submissions of short fiction or memoir (2000 words or fewer) on the theme “”Children’s Stories”” – We’re looking for stories that will appeal to children from pre-school through middle school ”

Share Your Story

http://www.fanstory.com/contestdetails.jsp?id=102429 March 8, 2016    For this contest, write about an event in your life. Everyone has a memoir. Not an autobiography. Too much concern about fact and convention. A memoir gives us the ability to write about our life with the option to create and fabricate and to make sense of a life, or part of that life. For this writing contest, write about a piece of your life!

TEMPLAR QUARTERLY PORTFOLIO AWARDS

http://templarpoetry.com/pages/submissions-and-awards                March 7, 2016    TEMPLAR POETRY offers submission opportunities for poets leading to publication in our full collections, our ground breaking range of poetry pamphlets and Iota Poetry magazine     “58 Dale Road Matlock Derbyshire DE4 3NB United Kingdom ”

The Milt Kessler Poetry Book Award

http://www.binghamton.edu/english/creative-writing/binghamton-center-for-writers/binghamton-book-awards/kessler-guidelines.html March 1, 2016    $1,000 Award for a book of poems written in English, 48 pages or more in length, selected by our judges as the strongest collection of poems published in 2015.     “Library North Room 1149 Vestal Parkway East P.O.Box 6000 Binghamton, NY13902-6000”

John Gardner Fiction Book Award

http://www.binghamton.edu/english/creative-writing/binghamton-center-for-writers/binghamton-book-awards/gardner-guidelines.html   March 1, 2016    “Sponsored by the Binghamton Center for Writers-State University of New York with support from the Office of the Dean of Binghamton University’s Harpur College of the Arts & Sciences – $1,000 Award for the book of fiction written in English selected by our judges as the strongest novel or collection of fiction published in 2015.”            “Library North Room 1149 Vestal Parkway East P.O.Box 6000 Binghamton, NY13902-6000”

Children’s Book Publishing in the 21st Century: A Children’s Literary Salon

The main branch of the New York Public Library provided respite from the drizzle and crowds of umbrella-carrying holiday shoppers, as children’s book professionals gathered on Saturday, December 6, for a panel discussion on the state of the publishing industry. The speakers were Neal Porter, editor, Neal Porter Books at Roaring Brook Press; Susan Roth, artist; Leonard S. Marcus, children’s literature historian; Caroline Ward, librarian, Ferguson Library, Stamford, Ct.; Laurent Linn, art director, Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers; and Elizabeth Harding, v-p, Curtis Brown Ltd. Author-illustrator Jane Breskin Zalben served as moderator. The speakers focused specifically on picture books and how the stories of today are being discovered, published, marketed, and consumed by readers.

(From l.): Jane Breskin Zalben, Neal Porter, Susan Roth, Leonard S. Marcus, Caroline Ward, Elizabeth Harding, and Laurent Linn discuss children’s books at the New York Public Library.

Zalben opened the discussion by offering a short overview of some of the ways that the children’s book market has changed over the years. She cited the rise of “really successful” independent bookstores in the 1980s, and the impact of Barnes & Noble and Borders chain stores on indie stores, followed by the subsequent closing of Borders in 2009. Today, she said, Amazon clearly poses a significant threat to the indie book market. Children’s bookstores are frequently relying on toy sales to gain revenue, and chains like Barnes & Noble are reluctant to carry picture books; subsequently, publishers must also strategically select the books they champion. Considering the discoverability challenges that picture books face, Zalben posed this question to the panelists: how likely is it that a classic like Goodnight Moon (which took around 10 years after its publication to even develop notoriety) would be published today at all?

Continue reading here:  http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/childrens/childrens-industry-news/article/65006-children-s-book-publishing-in-the-21st-century-a-children-s-literary-salon.html

Guaranteed Author Interviews

webinarWe are delighted to bring you a new series of interviews with successful authors!

Learn from people who have been there and done it…

 

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Guaranteed Author Interview Series – Piu Eatwell

Do you want to know what it takes to get published with a Traditional Publisher?

Learn valuable lessons about that entire process from someone who has been there and done it – Author, Piu Eatwell.  

Piu will share the lessons she learned along the way – and hear what she says she wouldn’t do again!

http://guaranteedauthor.com/interview-piu-eatwell/

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Guaranteed Author Interview Series – Devon Harris

Do you remember the movie ‘Cool Runnings’ about the Jamaican Olympic Bobsled Team?

Learn from original team member and Captain of the Jamaican Team, Devon Harris, about his journey through the maze of writing and self-publishing.

Devon will share the lessons he learned along the way – and hear what he has to say about staying motivated to achieve!

http://guaranteedauthor.com/interview-devon-harris/

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Guaranteed Author Interview Series – Mick Moore

Learn from Internet Marketing Legend, Mick Moore about his journey through the maze of writing and self-publishing.

Mick will share the lessons he learned along the way – and even some insider tips on how you can successfully promote and sell your book!

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Guaranteed Author Interview Series – Chris Steely

Learn about Chris’ experience becoming one of the authors of an anthology, alongside some of the ‘giants’ of the personal development world…


As a top-rated speaker, NCAA national rowing champion, U.S. Marine Corps Officer, corporate vice-president, business owner, MBA, world traveler, inspirational author, renowned global business coach, and devoted husband, Chris Steely has a vast array of life and leadership experience.

http://guaranteedauthor.com/interview-chris-steely/bar

 

Guaranteed Author Interview Series – Andy Updegrove

 

With one site serving over a million page views per month and another with over 7,000 subscribers, Andy certainly knows how to target his niche!

In addition to being legal counsel and strategic advisor, Andy Updrgrove is a published author who has built a significant online following.

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Guaranteed Author Interview Series – Christeen Bauer

Not sure whether you want to
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In today’s interview…  Learn valuable lessons about writing and publishing your book from Author, Christeen Bauer ~ someone who has been published both by a traditional publisher & also as a self-published author…

Christeen shares the lessons she learned along the way – and hear what she says she wouldn’t do again!

http://guaranteedauthor.com/interview-christeen-bauer/

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How to Structure Your Book and Stay on Track

So many people say the main reason they haven’t started or haven’t finished writing their book is they don’t know how to structure it and then stay on track!

Here is an example of just one of the audio segments from the Guaranteed Author program to help with that very issue:

I know it’s scary to think about actually writing and publishing that book that’s been inside you for so long – I know because I’ve been there…

If you would like to get support each and every week to help you finally write and PUBLISH your book, it costs the equivalent of less than $3.50 per day…

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course-limited-time*** For a LIMITED TIME, we are removing the initial $297!   It’s now only $97 per month – but you will need to act quickly as we can’t guarantee that we can maintain that discounted price for long…

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Weekly Group Coaching Call every single week for a YEAR! (normally $1250/mo = $15,000/year) plus the calls are recorded just in case you can’t make the actual call. You are invited to attend at least 2 Live Personal Events (max 50 people) with Author and Coach, Leigh St John in fabulous places such as Las Vegas, historic Charleston or beside the water in California, to talk specifically about YOUR book… (normally $2500 per event) start-today-button

 

If not now, then when are you FINALLY going to get the help you need to write and publish your book..?

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7 Reasons Why Most Authors Fail

Now that the Self Publishing Podcast is almost 2 years old (old enough to drink and sell sexual favors, in podcast years), we’re beginning to notice some definite trends. We focused on a lot of the things that work in our self publishing bookWrite. Publish. Repeat, but it’s time to turn things around and bum everybody out.

Knowing what doesn’t work is just as important, because we all have defense mechanisms that let us justify tons of stupid crap.

Time to tip that sanctimonius cow over.

“I’m not doing what the guys suggest in Write. Publish. Repeat because I have my own ways but am obeying the same principles,” you may be saying, “so why am I not getting anywhere?”

Well, are you doing any of what follows in addition to all that “different but still correct” stuff? Because if you are, then Houston, you definitely have a problem.

Here the biggest reasons that self-publishers fail.

1. Not Starting

Let’s start with the most obvious one. It kills me even to include it, but there are actually people out there saying you can be a writer without writing, so I feel the need to step up and lob that idiot ball back into the idiot court.

InertiaIf you do not write, you are not a writer.

That’s all there is to it. I can’t believe there is feel-good bullshit out there claiming that writing can be “within” you and that you can go around, wear a beret, and claim to be a writer even if you’ve written nothing.

Oh, those words are inside you? They’reincubating? Well, whoopity fucking doo for you! Good luck with spreading your ideas. Good luck getting sales. Good luck paying rent. Good luck getting your spouse or significant others to support you in spending time away from grunt work to do it.

Most people don’t put metaphorical pen to paper because they’re afraid. I get it. We’ve all been there. We’re not bashing you for being afraid — afraid of failing, afraid of being judged harshly, afraid that everyone will laugh at you. We understand that fear, but the only way to be a writer — especially a successful one — is to get past the fear and start. Your sweating ridicule, though understandable, is probably exaggerated. In most cases, nobody is paying attention to whether you succeed or fail. 

If you write, you’re a writer. You’ve started. Excellent job. Now do more, and pour in the hours to do it better.

2. Not Finishing

This one should also be obvious, but we see it all the time. In these cases, writers aren’t surprised that they’re not successful, but are incredibly frustrated. We understand. Before joining the podcast, I couldn’t finish a second book. Before meeting Sean, Dave hadn’t finished his first. The phenomenon of the writer with great ideas but no clue where to take her story is all too familiar.

But take heart. The toughest nuts crack if you just keep trying. We also hope our upcoming Kickstarter project Fiction Unboxed will show a few frustrated “can’t finish” writers a few tricks by opening up every detail of exactly how Sean and I make the donuts.

Sometimes, though, it’s not a matter of not knowing how. Most cases of writer’s block, in our opinion, can be easily reduced to simple fear. Again, we understand. Once you finish your book, you must either publish it or confess to your fear. Once published, everyone will be able to read the language of your soul … and, in a few cases, criticize it.

You must push past this. Don’t worry about making your book perfect, because it never can be. Make it professional (see the next section) and get a good edit and generally make it as clean as you possibly can, but don’t sweat the story over and over and over at the expense of shipping. Sean has said on the podcast, “perfect is the enemy of done.” And it’s true. Don’t be perfect. In most cases, it’s best to be finished.

If you must use a pen name because you’re so terrified that what you’ve written is terrible, do that. But you have to ship it. You can’t move on until you do.

Finish, then finish more.

Keep moving, and improving.

3. Treating Publishing Like … Continue reading here:  http://selfpublishingpodcast.com/7-reasons-why-most-authors-fail/?utm_source=feedly&utm_reader=feedly&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=7-reasons-why-most-authors-fail

6 Of The Best Pieces of Advice From Successful Writers

I’ve been reading some advice from successful writers lately and exploring what their routines are like to see what I can learn about them.

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Here are six of the most common pieces of advice I came across that have helped me a lot improving my writing here at Buffer.

It also features actionable tips for you on how to implement them in your own writing.

 

1. The best ways to get over the “blank page hurdle”

 

I write because it comes out — and then to get paid for it afterwards? I told somebody, at some time, that writing is like going to bed with a beautiful woman and afterwards she gets up, goes to her purse and gives me a handful of money. I’ll take it. — Charles Bukowski

Unlike Charles Bukowski, writing well doesn’t come so easily for a lot of us (including me). It takes a lot of mental energy, strains your working memory and often makes you feel vulnerable if you try to be open and honest in your work.

 

The pure effort of writing is hard enough, but coupled with the pain of putting your work out into the world and letting others judge it, this can be enough to stop you from getting started at all.

 

The trick to overcoming this isn’t easy, but it’s surprisingly effective: give yourself permission to write badly, and just start.

Anne Lamott, author of Bird by Bird wrote an excellent essay on why writers must start with horrible drafts:

I know some very great writers, writers you love who write beautifully and have made a great deal of money, and not one of them sits down routinely feeling wildly enthusiastic and confident. Not one of them writes elegant first drafts. All right, one of them does, but we do not like her very much.

Anne’s essay makes me feel much better about the hard work of writing great content, as she makes it clear that all great writers struggle with their first drafts:

We all often feel like we are pulling teeth, even those writers whose prose ends up being the most natural and fluid.

So to get over the biggest hurdle–the blank page–just get writing. Don’t be afraid that your draft might be bad (it probably will be, but that’s okay.)

Almost all good writing begins with terrible first efforts. You need to start somewhere. Start by getting something – anything – down on paper.

10 Rules for Writing First Drafts

 

(Great infographic from Copyblogger)

2. Discard clichés: How to stop writing like “you’re meant to write”

Down with the cliché! If only it were that easy. Clichés surround us, and it’s surprisingly hard to avoid using them.

Put simply, in writing, clichés are bland and overused phrases that fail to excite, motivate, and impress your readers or prospective buyers. (6)

Clichés dominate our language both in speaking and writing. This is because we hear them all the time, so they become the first phrases that come to mind when we want to express ourselves. Which is exactly why they’re a problem:

Given that clichés are the phrases that have struck our eardrums uncountable times, we either don’t associate them with particular ideas and products, or we associate many products and ideas with a particular cliché. 

The fact that clichés are so generic you can attach them to any idea makes them ineffective. (6)

This actually has a lot to do with how we take in words and phrases when we read. The more familiar a term or phrase becomes, the more often we start skipping over it as we read, rendering it ineffective.

 

The best way to avoid this problem is to use different language to explain familiar concepts.It’s a careful balancing act between being so different that your readers are turned off by the effort of understanding your content and being so familiar that your work becomes trite.

In other words, your audience has to feel your content is new, but also credible. (7)

 

3. Don’t make it sound like writing, instead “Write like you speak”

 

It is only by writing, not dreaming about it, that we develop our own style. — P.D. James

Novelist and screenwriter Elmore Leonard knew how important the reader was. More important than his English Composition teachers, that’s for sure. He never let “proper” writing get in the way of telling a great story and making it engaging for the reader.

If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it. — Elmore Leonard

Writing like you speak is harder than it might sound. For some reason, it’s easy to “put on” a tone when you start writing, without even realising it. This is something I’m still working on, and it takes a lot of practice.

 

In Kurt Vonnegut’s list of rules for writing with style, he explains how much better his writing is when it sounds the way he talks:

I myself find that I trust my own writing most, and others seem to trust it most, too, when I sound most like a person from Indianapolis, which is what I am.

One thing that’s really helped me to improve in this area is a trick that Leo taught me:imagine someone sitting in front of you as you type, and write as if you’re talking to them.

Continue reading # 4-6 here:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/belle-beth-cooper/6-of-the-best-pieces-of-a_b_4628690.html

The Secret to Writing a Best-selling Novel

I was intrigued by an article in the British publication the Telegraph which seemed quite extraordinary. The piece was entitled, “Scientists Find Secret to Writing a Best-selling Novel.”

For a writer, what could be more arresting than such a headline?

Among other things, the article said: “Computer scientists have developed an algorithm which can predict with 84 percent accuracy whether a book will be a commercial success — and the secret is to avoid clichés and excessive use of verbs.”

Computer scientists at Stony Brook University in New York employed a technique called statistical stylometry to mathematically examine the use of words and grammar in predicting how popular a book would be. While certain elements were analyzed, the scientists acknowledged that a “range of factors” would help determine a book’s success, including “interestingness, novelty, style of writing, and whether or not a storyline is engaging.” They also allowed that another external factor plays a significant role in the success of many books: luck.

Most authors will attest to the last factor.

To arrive at their findings, the group downloaded classics from the Project Gutenberg archive and analyzed the novels’ texts. They compared the algorithm’s predictions to historical information of each work’s success. Everything from science fiction to classic literature and poetry was included. The article discussed several trends found in successful novels, including the number of conjunctions, nouns, adjectives and verbs used by the authors. To find less successful books, the researchers scoured Amazon for books ranking low in sales. Assistant Profession Yejin Choi, one of the paper’s authors said, “To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first that provides quantitative insights into the connection between the writing style and the success of literary works.”

Professor Choi referred to “the secret recipe” of successful novels. He said, “Our work examines 800 books over multiple genres, providing insights into lexical, syntactic and discourse patterns that characterize the writing styles commonly shared in successful literature.”

Keep reading here:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mark-rubinstein/the-secret-to-writing-a-b_1_b_4630781.html

EBooks: Friend or Foe?

EBooks: Friend or Foe?

by: John Joseph Burhop

Publishing is a $35 billion industry. Up until just a few years ago, that meant almost exclusively books, magazines, newspapers, and other small items such as brochures and business cards. The internet has changed all that in more ways than one. Enter the eBook, or downloadable electronic book. Although early versions of the eBook have been around since the 1970’s, it wasn’t until late in 2007 that Amazon’s eBook Reader, the Kindle, was released, and not until 2009 that dedicated reading hardware was produced. According to the Association of American Publishers, eBook sales rose 176.6% to $169.5 million in 2009. Another report, this one conducted by Forrester Research, an independent research company that provides pragmatic and forward-thinking advice to global leaders in business and technology, predicts that eBook sales will cross the $1 billion line in 2011.

When I first realized that eBook Readers were already starting to render the paperback book obsolete, I became distraught. That’s because I had been working on my science fiction novel, on and off, for the better part of the last twenty years and it was very near completion. My novel was always meant to be a paperback; a handy little book that could easily fit in a backpack or a purse. I even knew what the cover art would look like: planet Earth in the background with my main character leaving orbit in his tiny spaceship while two unfolding alien spacecraft approached. I had it all figured out. I knew the printing industry was already getting hit hard but I figured the unique tactile act of reading a paperback book still had a good decade left in it. I don’t believe that anymore. Of course, there will be die-hard paperback fans for many years to come, but eBook Readers are already starting to mimic the experience of having an actual book in your hands. It finally dawned on me that eBook Readers were not my enemy, they were, in fact, very much my friend.

Finding a publisher who is willing to invest their time and money to print thousands of copies of a book written by an unknown author is extremely difficult, to say the least. However, with services such as Amazon.com and Smashwords.com, an unknown author can publish a completed novel, poetry manuscript, or collection of short stories and make it available for sale to basically anyone with internet access in a single day. And the best part is that It’s Free! There are, of course, many more online publishers than just Amazon and Smashwords but many of them are not free. I did finish my novel and published it to Amazon.com’s Kindle platform and Smashwords.com for sale at $9.99. It’s very exciting to see copies of my eBook being bought by people who somehow found my novel among the millions of titles already available through a number of online publishers. I then decided to publish a collection of poetry that I compiled from my high school and college years.

So if you’ve written your memoirs, or have a book length manuscript, or even a collection of short stories or poetry, I highly recommend that you put them up for sale at Amazon.com’s Kindle Store and Smashwords.com. Remember, it’s totally free. Simply go to www.Amazon.com and find the “Self-publish with Us” link at the bottom of the page. Then simply click the “Get Started” link in the Kindle Books section of that page. From there you can set up your account, upload your manuscript, and then name your price. According to the research I’ve done, it’s wise not to price your book too low or potential customers will get the impression that it’s of lesser value than the higher priced options available in the same category. I decided that $9.99 was a reasonable price for my book since it consisted of 36 chapters containing nearly 120,000 words- the length of a decent paperback. $9.99 may seem high for a paperback-length book but there are thousands of eBook titles selling successfully in the $20-$30 range. Granted, many of those higher priced titles are best selling books that have been available to the general public for decades in print form. But because your book is new, it just may attract a customer base that could put some extra cash in your pocket or simply get you noticed for other potentially profitable projects.

Make sure that your manuscript starts out strong because one of the services offered by eBook publishers is a free sample of your work, usually the first 20%. Selling your book is a tough business, but for those of us who believe that what we’re writing is worthwhile for others to read, there’s always a chance for great success. And remember, your customers don’t even need an eBook reader to enjoy your book; they can download it to any PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone, Blackberry, or Android. I invite all the readers of this article to sample the first few chapters of my science fiction novel “Rise of The Kek” and my poetry manuscript “The Universe Can Never Be Complete” for free. Simply search for either title at Amazon.com or Smashwords.com.

About The Author

John Burhop is a 44 year old author who graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Creative Writing: Fiction from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. His science fiction novel “Rise of The Kek” and his poetry manuscript “The Universe Can Never Be Complete” are both available for instant download at Amazon.com and Smashwords.com.

Marketing My Book: Attract More Readers than Most Best Selling Authors

Attract More Readers than Most Best Selling Authors

Many people dream of writing a best-selling business book. Surely, the world is waiting for their unique wisdom . . . or so they think. The reality is far different. The average business book offered by a major publisher sells about 5,000 copies. Even if everyone who gets a copy reads it, that’s not a lot of influence.

By comparison, a best selling business book typically sells 50,000 to 100,000 copies. Of those copies, about 10 percent will ever be opened . . . and less than 5 percent will be read cover to cover. Reach 10,000 readers. Big deal.

Let’s look at how creating breakthrough solutions (ways of accomplishing 20 times as much with the same time, effort, and resources) can change the result.

When both usage and delivery effectiveness improve, stakeholders can gain 20 times more benefits than from either improvement alone. When that combination happens, these two complementary breakthrough solutions acquire the power of 20 or more individual breakthrough solutions. That’s what I mean by a breakthrough squared solution. You can also think of this concept as developing a 40,000 percent improvement, or a 400 times increase in benefits.

To some, that goal may seem remote. Keep an open mind while I share an example of creating breakthrough squared solutions for inexpensively attracting more readers to my books.

In 1998, a best-selling author friend told us that it was important to distribute tens of thousands of free copies of business books either just before the book is published or right after publication. Tom Peters, coauthor of In Search of Excellence (reissue edition, Warner Books, 1988), tells the same story about one aspect of how that book became a blockbuster.

When I was writing my first book, I heeded that advice. Before publication, I sent out thousands of draft copies for advance reading. After publication, I sent out thousands more free copies of the completed book to influential readers. In addition, I created a Web site for the book and put all but two chapters online there for free reader access. The cost to do this sampling was over $40,000.

I estimate that these activities have directly yielded 20,000 people who have read some part of that book. That means our cost per reader for just this activity was about $2.00.

Since royalties on books like ours are usually around $2.00, this was a money-losing proposition unless this distribution yielded sales of at least 20,000 additional books. In the case of our friend, this was no concern because his company had paid this sampling expense.

My costs, however, came out of my personal pocket. I needed to do better.

For my third book, I decided to create a breakthrough squared solution for advance distribution. For that book, I only provided free advance copies to those who helped us create the book. The cost for those copies was about $1,200. I then wrote brief articles based on the book and arranged to have them published in prestigious journals and magazines.

I next condensed the articles and turned them into brief guides that the online bookseller Amazon publishes for free. In the first four years, I estimate that over 50,000 people read some part of that book through these efforts. I estimate that total readership through this approach will swell to 100,000 people by the time the third book has been in print as long as the first book has been. If that occurs, I will have produced 100,000 readers at a cost of $1,200. That means the cost per reader will be $0.012.

The first book’s campaign cost 166 times as much per reader as what the latter campaign did, and I will actually draw more readers with the new, less expensive effort. These estimated results will provide me with a 66,000 percent solution compared to our first approach (16,500 percent lower cost per reader multiplied by 400 percent more readers).

For a forthcoming book I am developing, that sampling solution has been further enhanced. The pre-launch involves a blog in which the material is tested for reader reaction. I estimate that more than 200,000 people will have read some part of the book through the blog before the book is published, and the cost is only the electricity to post the blog entries.

I will also reuse the Amazon guides that worked well for the third book to add another 100,000 readers at limited cost. Publication publicity will probably draw another few hundred thousand people to the blog samples.

I also plan to send millions of excerpts for free by e-mail to people who subscribe to various complementary newsletters. We should be able to increase our total readers by several hundred more percent. Since I carry advertising on the blog, I have a revenue offset to our costs. If enough clicks occur from the blog to advertisers’ sites, this sampling program may well turn out to be free. As you can see, repeating such a process on the same or a similar problem can be profoundly valuable in making further improvements.

Now you know how you can reach best-selling reader levels for your next business book. What are you waiting for?

About the Author

Donald Mitchell is an author of seven books including Adventures of an Optimist, The 2,000 Percent Squared Solution, The 2,000 Percent Solution, The 2,000 Percent Solution Workbook, The Irresistible Growth Enterprise, and The Ultimate Competitive Advantage.

Read about creating breakthroughs through 2,000 percent solutions and receive tips by e-mail
by registering for free at http://www.2000percentsolution.com .