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Month: July 2012

Writing Your Book: Do You Have Trouble Puttings Words to Paper?

Do You Have Trouble Puttings Words to Paper

A writer will use a number of different techniques when using their words to grab a reader’s attention. They know that some people respond to some ways of writing better than others. There are also styles of writing that are more fitting when used in specific circumstances. When writing some form of communication it’s useful to be able to identify what these different techniques are, and to be able to use the most appropriate for the writing you are going to undertake. However it should be noted that in many forms of communication it is appropriate to use more than one technique in the same piece of writing.

Description — this is something you will do in such communications as letters — where you write about a series of events, or you tell of something that you have done. You may be writing about something you have bought, such as an item of clothing, or a place you have visited. In a piece of descriptive writing you will give details about your subject, usually using your senses as a guide to show the reader what you experienced. For example you can tell them what color the sweater is, how hot the weather was, whether the disco was too noisy, or the restaurant had an overpowering smell of garlic. Using your senses in this way the person who reads your writing will be able to get some kind of mental picture of the situation your writing about.

Good description will cover as many of the senses as possible, as well as just tell of the event. ‘We went to a disco’ isn’t going to give the reader much of a visual image other than a place to dance. “We went to a disco that was so crowded we hardly had room to dance. The air was smoky, and the music loud. It was great!” This gives a different image all together. It brings the experience to life for them.

Narration — this is where you tell a story. You don’t have to give as much description but you do write out the things that happened. For example, “We went to the disco. The place was so crowded that we couldn’t dance very well, so we ended up propping up a wall for most of the evening. I found it a bit stuffy because of the smoke machine that kept blowing smoke around the dance floor, plus smoking cigarettes was allowed at the bar and the smell drifted across the room and mingled with the different perfumes and aftershaves worn by the dancers.” This is more of a story than the pure description and your reader will be able to follow your experience to the full.

Persuasion — now this is a writing technique that many writers use to help businesses sell their products. They understand the target buyer and they write in such a way as to entice them to buy something. They use words to create a sense of need or want in the reader’s mind.

For example, “Do you want to look years younger? Do you know that within 7 days you can take 10 years off your face simply by applying a specially formulated cream?” Of course most women over the age of 25 are going to be interested in this product, and will want to read more about it and probably try it out. You can even use this kind of writing if you are trying to convince someone to go somewhere with you by writing about what’s in it for them, as in “You love dancing, and this is where all the top celebrities are hanging out. Even Britney’s been seen there!”

When starting to write something, think about this article and the different kinds of writing techniques you can use, and choose the one that best suits the kind of writing you’re about to do.

About the Author

Jane Saeman runs an In-Home Tutoring service called Aim High Tutors. Find out about how to help your student reach their full potential – at http://www.aimhightutors.com/blog

Writing My Book: How to Write Your Single Book into a Wildly Successful Book Series

How to Write Your Single Book into a Wildly Successful Book Series

Are you planning to write just one book? Wait! Before you decide, at least let me show you how easy it is to make your single book into a series of books. By the way, publishers love book series and readers become fanatical over a serial of books.

Begin to change your thinking. Don’t look at your book as a one time thing or a one title event. Begin to look at it as the beginning of your successful author journey. If you are looking for an easier journey, more rewards and more profits with a series of books, follow the tips below:

1. Slash your huge book into separate books. The easiest way to do this is to separate your book into chunks, chapters, sections and parts. Writing this way will allow you to divide and conquer. You can easily take the chunks or sections and divide them into several books. Your readers will love that you made your book such an easy read and buy each one of them.

2. Put your overflow information into a second book. Gather all the overflow research material. You know all the extra information discovered that wouldn’t fit into your first book. Put it in order and develop it into a separate book. For example, if one of your chapters is becoming bloated with information overload consider marking it for book two. There’s no better time to start collecting information for book two than when you are organizing book one.

3. Poll your readers for a key point they want to know more about. Expound on a point your readers show interest in knowing more about. If you don’t know already, try to discover their problems and write the solutions in the next book. Handle this well and your sequel may sell better than the previous book.

4. Select a sub-topic to do further research. Do more research on one of your book’s sub-topics. Take a sub-topic that you only touched on in the first book and cover if fully in the sequel. Your readers will love the additional information and anticipate buying the next volume.

5. Write a companion book for the original book. You can excerpt sections from your first book, insert groups of checklists, discussion or reflection questions and voila you have a study guide or workbook.

6. Develop a meditation or journal book. Gather quotes related to your book’s topic and pair them with excerpts from your original book to put in a meditation book or devotional. Or create a journal with quotes from your original books in the corner of each lined page of the journal. You can number them according to weeks, days or lessons. For example, 52 weeks of inspiring thoughts or 365 days of inspirational thoughts from your book’s topic.

7. Repurpose your material for a different audience. Plan another edition of your book for a different audience than the original book. Remember the Chicken Soup for Teen-Agers, Prisoners, Mothers and so on sold better than the original Chicken Soup for the Soul. The original book was for a more general audience. Find out how you can target your audience even more and you may discover a better selling market within a general market.

If you don’t change your thinking, your book could end up being a tiny drop in the scheme of life. Instead plan a wildly successful series of books and make the splash you’re destined to make. You may feel you can’t dream that big. No worries; start with the simple tips above. Expand your thinking. Dream a bigger dream and write your single book into a plethora of books. I look forward to seeing your name in print many times.

About the Author

Earma Brown, 12 year author and business owner helps small business owners and writers who want to write their best book now! Earma mentors other writers and business professionals through her monthly ezine “iScribe.” Send any email to iscribe@bookwritinghelp.com for free mini-course “Jumpstart Writing Your Book” or visit her at How to Write a Book.

http://www.bookwritinghelp.com/

Marketing My Book: Attract More Readers than Most Best Selling Authors

Attract More Readers than Most Best Selling Authors

Many people dream of writing a best-selling business book. Surely, the world is waiting for their unique wisdom . . . or so they think. The reality is far different. The average business book offered by a major publisher sells about 5,000 copies. Even if everyone who gets a copy reads it, that’s not a lot of influence.

By comparison, a best selling business book typically sells 50,000 to 100,000 copies. Of those copies, about 10 percent will ever be opened . . . and less than 5 percent will be read cover to cover. Reach 10,000 readers. Big deal.

Let’s look at how creating breakthrough solutions (ways of accomplishing 20 times as much with the same time, effort, and resources) can change the result.

When both usage and delivery effectiveness improve, stakeholders can gain 20 times more benefits than from either improvement alone. When that combination happens, these two complementary breakthrough solutions acquire the power of 20 or more individual breakthrough solutions. That’s what I mean by a breakthrough squared solution. You can also think of this concept as developing a 40,000 percent improvement, or a 400 times increase in benefits.

To some, that goal may seem remote. Keep an open mind while I share an example of creating breakthrough squared solutions for inexpensively attracting more readers to my books.

In 1998, a best-selling author friend told us that it was important to distribute tens of thousands of free copies of business books either just before the book is published or right after publication. Tom Peters, coauthor of In Search of Excellence (reissue edition, Warner Books, 1988), tells the same story about one aspect of how that book became a blockbuster.

When I was writing my first book, I heeded that advice. Before publication, I sent out thousands of draft copies for advance reading. After publication, I sent out thousands more free copies of the completed book to influential readers. In addition, I created a Web site for the book and put all but two chapters online there for free reader access. The cost to do this sampling was over $40,000.

I estimate that these activities have directly yielded 20,000 people who have read some part of that book. That means our cost per reader for just this activity was about $2.00.

Since royalties on books like ours are usually around $2.00, this was a money-losing proposition unless this distribution yielded sales of at least 20,000 additional books. In the case of our friend, this was no concern because his company had paid this sampling expense.

My costs, however, came out of my personal pocket. I needed to do better.

For my third book, I decided to create a breakthrough squared solution for advance distribution. For that book, I only provided free advance copies to those who helped us create the book. The cost for those copies was about $1,200. I then wrote brief articles based on the book and arranged to have them published in prestigious journals and magazines.

I next condensed the articles and turned them into brief guides that the online bookseller Amazon publishes for free. In the first four years, I estimate that over 50,000 people read some part of that book through these efforts. I estimate that total readership through this approach will swell to 100,000 people by the time the third book has been in print as long as the first book has been. If that occurs, I will have produced 100,000 readers at a cost of $1,200. That means the cost per reader will be $0.012.

The first book’s campaign cost 166 times as much per reader as what the latter campaign did, and I will actually draw more readers with the new, less expensive effort. These estimated results will provide me with a 66,000 percent solution compared to our first approach (16,500 percent lower cost per reader multiplied by 400 percent more readers).

For a forthcoming book I am developing, that sampling solution has been further enhanced. The pre-launch involves a blog in which the material is tested for reader reaction. I estimate that more than 200,000 people will have read some part of the book through the blog before the book is published, and the cost is only the electricity to post the blog entries.

I will also reuse the Amazon guides that worked well for the third book to add another 100,000 readers at limited cost. Publication publicity will probably draw another few hundred thousand people to the blog samples.

I also plan to send millions of excerpts for free by e-mail to people who subscribe to various complementary newsletters. We should be able to increase our total readers by several hundred more percent. Since I carry advertising on the blog, I have a revenue offset to our costs. If enough clicks occur from the blog to advertisers’ sites, this sampling program may well turn out to be free. As you can see, repeating such a process on the same or a similar problem can be profoundly valuable in making further improvements.

Now you know how you can reach best-selling reader levels for your next business book. What are you waiting for?

About the Author

Donald Mitchell is an author of seven books including Adventures of an Optimist, The 2,000 Percent Squared Solution, The 2,000 Percent Solution, The 2,000 Percent Solution Workbook, The Irresistible Growth Enterprise, and The Ultimate Competitive Advantage.

Read about creating breakthroughs through 2,000 percent solutions and receive tips by e-mail
by registering for free at http://www.2000percentsolution.com .

Writing My Book: Listen To The Critics

Listen To The Critics

Back in 1999, I wrote my very first self-published book. I wrote it in Microsoft Word®, then took it down to Kinko’s to be copied and bound. I sold several of those books without one ounce of feedback, good or bad.

Then a retired minister contacted me; he told me the book was good, but could be so much better. It was hard hearing his constructive criticism but I listened. I made the changes as fast as I could and then I sent him a complimentary copy. He emailed me immediately, ecstatic that I had rewritten the book because it was exactly what he needed. In fact, he was so thrilled with the new content that he offered to pay me for the second copy. (I declined his offer.)

I stopped printing and began selling the e-book version. The e-book began to make more money and word of mouth spread.

A few years later, I received an email from another gentleman who loved the e-book but felt it was lacking information. I asked what he felt was missing and where he was having trouble. He emailed me back some specifics. Once again, I went to work to improve the material in that e-book and sent him the finalized draft. A few weeks later he wrote back to tell me that the e-book was a hit! In fact, he was praising it all over the Internet and had received several job leads because of it.

Had I insisted my e-book was fine just the way it was, I would have made a few hundred bucks a month, but thanks to the feedback I received and my willingness to improve my book to meet the needs of its audience, I now sell over $1,000 per month of that very e-book! (And that is all by word of mouth…I have yet to pay for advertising for that e-book.)

So how do you go about getting feedback? You ask for it!

1. Include a questionnaire with every item you sell. Provide a multiple choice or fill in the blank survey.

2. Send an email to every customer who provided you with an email address. After three weeks from the date of purchase, send your customer an email asking for feedback on the product/service purchased. In exchange you will enter his/her name into a drawing for a prize at the end of the year. (Make sure you have your drawing rules and disclaimer in the email or a link back to a web page on your company site.)

3. Send a sample of your product to trusted friends, colleagues, and/or business associates and ask for their honest feedback. (Remind them that you’ll return the favor.)

4. Hire an outside company to get a survey going.

Sometimes, we don’t know everything and listening to feedback from our customers can improve our bottom line if we’re willing to improve our product or service.

About the Author

Alyice Edrich
Available for Hire
www.alyiceedrich.net
www.thedabblingmum.com

Writing and Publishing My Book: Sources Of Ideas For Writing Your Books

Sources Of Ideas For Writing Your Books

A writing source provides not only inspiration, but also a place from where you can derive knowledge about the topic you are writing about. So, if you are writing about carpentry, it is essential that you learn some basic technical terms associated with carpentry such as hammer, chisel, etc, and their uses. It would definitely help if you have done carpentry work yourself, because that experience will give you a much deeper, personal understanding of your subject.

You might fall short on some ideas while writing, so you will have to research more on those subjects. You can do that by reading magazines or watching videos and CDs. You can also consult an expert carpenter, and he can give you many tips. You could even get tips by searching the Internet, which has now become a sea of information — just be careful about the quality or truthfulness of some of that information.

Since there could be thousands of books already written on carpentry, you need to either present new information in your book, or you can present your information in a different way so as to make your book more interesting than others. Writing a book without a proper source of information could result in a badly written book or faulty data. Either way, the results could be damaging.

Whenever you are searching for a source of information for your book, you should first ensure that you yourself are interested in that subject. Next, you have to ensure that people who read the book would also be interested in it. Also, you will have to write the book in a new, appealing way.

Nowadays, unscrupulous elements in the scientific world are using ‘copy-paste’ methods to pass off important research as their own. Use technical data, combined with your imagination, to present it in an attractive way. So, if you have taken your source from a previous book, you will have to acknowledge that source and also seek permission from that author before writing your book.

Children’s books, especially, require a lot of imagination to be full of attractive photos. The subject matter should be informative and the photos should be relevant. A fictional book is a place where you could let your imagination run wild. But here again, the source of your book and character should be properly researched. Incorporating and acknowledging a source in your book also gives it credibility and respectability, and helps people to know that you know what you are writing about.

So, just as a river requires a source of water, you too will require a rock solid source to ensure that your book turns out to be a bestseller.

About the Author

Victor Epand is an expert consultant about books. When shopping for books, we recommend you shop only at the best bookstores for used books, autographed books, and vedic books.

http://www.usedbooksell.com/

http://www.sellautographedbooks.com/

http://www.vedicbooks.info/

Writing and Publishing My Book: The Curse of Writer’s Block

The Curse of Writer’s Block

Writer’s Block. A curse well known to anybody that has ever been required to put quill to ink, pen to paper or, in keeping with technology, finger to keyboard. The sudden phenomenon that comes out of nowhere like a falling piano and lampoons all efforts at creativity when it is specifically required.

The most common cause is a simple lack of inspiration yet the curse can also be linked to depression and anxiety, mood disorders caused by changes in the brain’s frontal lobe. A widely held belief is that the sudden ceasing of ideas and creativity is all part of the natural ebb and flow of the process. It could also be claimed that it is a result of trying to pin down something elusive and free in the same way that a comedian who, upon discovery of their trade, is beseeched “go on then, tell us a joke.” Ask a writer to give a thousand words on a set subject and the words will flow, ask a writer to give twenty on a subject of their own choice and sooner or later the well runs dry.

Henry Roth is perhaps the most famous sufferer of writer’s block. Roth’s first novel “Call It Sleep” was published in 1934 and was regarded as a depression-era masterpiece. After beginning and aborting his second novel, Roth was struck with the dreaded Writer’s Block and worked as a firefighter, a teacher, a labourer and anything that didn’t require him to write before retiring. His second novel “Nature’s First Green” was eventually published in 1979. Roth’s block was due to a combination of depression, an unwillingness to confront the problems of his past and, strangely, political problems.

Widely-acclaimed film makers the Coen brothers also suffered under the curse of Writer’s Block whilst working on a screenplay for their prohibition-era film “Millers Crossing.” A dark and twisting story of gangsters and corruption revolving around a femme fatale, “Millers Crossing” is certainly a great film yet when Joel and Ethan Coen hit a block they decided to make an art of Writer’s Block. More specifically, they wrote a film, “Barton Fink,” about a writer of social realist plays whose creative juices run dry when he is called up to Hollywood to draft a script about a wrestler. The result? “Barton Fink” won the coveted Palme d’Or atthe Cannes festival by unanimous vote and awards for Best Director and Actor.

For most writers afflicted by the terrifying Block a clean sweep of Cannes’ top three awards is unlikely. So it needs to be overcome, easier said than done, right? There are some strategies for battling the Block. Tike time to write and work and write no matter what, regardless of the quality. The writing muscle needs to be exercised like any other and the more you practice the more will flow easily.

If, as commonly opined, Writer’s Block comes from a lack of inspiration or new ideas, do something unusual. Take a journey, go to the Zoo, take a drive, just leave your desk and something will spark off a fire of creativity. Alternatively, simply go somewhere and don’t write. Take a couple of days off and relax, let your mind un-clutter and return to that empty page with a clear mind. Fresh air is a great healer. When getting away from your desk don’t just move to another chair, go for a walk. Get some exercise and oxygenate your brain. Walking is one of the widest practice cures for the Block and you never know what or who you’ll see while you do it.

Whatever you do, don’t give up, or try writing about Writer’s Block, it’s already been done and done well. Don’t lose faith, if you do run out of original and creative ideas you can always join the writing team for an American sitcom instead.

About the Author

Patrick is an expert travel researcher and writer currently researching Manchester Airport Parking, Bristol Airport Parking and Glasgow Airport Parking (http://www.holidayextras.co.uk/glasgow-airport-parking.html)

Writing and Publishing My Book: The Concept Of The Perfect Author

The Concept Of The Perfect Author

They are people that know everything about everything; When I was there, when I did that, when I met her; I am sure you get the idea.Enough about the I-experts and more about sharing your knowledge, your products, your services and even your experiences. How are you going to do all of that? Easy: submit articles. One has the opportunity to submit articles about any subject in the world and beyond. One can submit articles on how to do almost anything, how to fish, how to swim in a strong rip tide off the Australian coast. The limitation of subjects is no existent, the quality of the content must however be kept in check, if you want anyone to take you seriously as well as to publish the work you have done.

Everyone is an expert in some or other field, and when the submit articles they are effectively sharing their knowledge with the world via the internet and possibly making someone elses life a little easier by providing real solid advice and tips that are applicable to the real world. So think if you submit articles to an online directory and you have positively impacted upon someone somewhere in the world, does this not positively contribute to your own self? I believe it does, it is a process of sharing and giving with an open disposition, as you are writing the article from a point of view that you are not expecting to get paid for it, yet you are doing it out of passion for what you are writing about, and you have the opportunity of the spin off of affecting someone in a positive way. This is enough motivation for anyone to write and submit articles.

When you submit articles relating to sales and marketing of products and services you have the ability of constructing them correctly, without creating a marketing or advertising brochure, you will have the opportunity of driving so much more traffic to the desired website and thereby stand to gain tremendously from rankings and potential sales. When you submit articles related to your business the opportunity of elevating your perceived skill and knowledge level is realized, as the content you write with reference to your products and services will be reflect by your articles insight, advice and professionalism.

Take the initiative to submit articles, even if it is about an experience or personal knowledge you have gained over the years, you may find a publisher wants to use the article and that may well be the start of a writing career or boost your writing hobby. Go ahead find a directory and submit articles.

About the Author

If you believe yourself to be an author , you should join an article directory, exposure of your articles will achieve maximum results. Find out more at http://www.talkinmince.com/

Writing and Publishing My Book: How To Effectively Market Your Manuscript

How To Effectively Market Your Manuscript

It is extremely important that your manuscript is clean, clear and easy to read. For writers of both fact and fiction, there area few do’s and don’ts for anyone writing for a publication.

Some Useful Rules for submitting manuscripts

DO
* Establish the editorial requirements before you submit your manuscript.
* Include a brief covering letter and return postage.
* Ensure that the return envelope is large enough for your manuscript.
* Type/word process your manuscript double spaced on one side of A4 white paper.
* Put your name and title of the piece at the top of each page.
* Number each page consecutively.
* Indicate that more is to follow by putting ‘m/f’ or ‘contd’ at the end of the page.
* Use a paperclip to keep small manuscripts together.
* Take note of any advice given in rejection letters.
* Ensure that the manuscript neat, clean and easy to read.
* Use a dictionary to check your spellings.
* Check your manuscripts through for errors before sending it off.
* Persevere, persistence does pay off.

DON’T
* Submit handwritten manuscripts.
* Forget to number each page.
* Forget to put your name and the title of the piece on each page.
* Rely on a spellchecker to correct your spelling mistakes.
* Fasten the pages together with a staple or pin.
* Put your manuscript in a plastic folder.
* Decorate your manuscript with fancy fonts and squirls.
* Use a faint typewriter or a printer ribbon.
* Use continuous feed paper joined together with holed strips down the sides.
* Send a reply-pain return envelope too small to take your manuscript.
* Include irrelevant personal details in your covering letter.
* Send your manuscript to a totally unsuitable market.
* Telephone or email the editor, the day after you send the manuscript to see if it has arrived.
* Telephone or email the editor to ask why your manuscript was rejected.
* Telephone or email the editor (unless they ask you to or know your personally).

Choosing a title is very important because a title provides:
* A label for your manuscript.
* An eye-catching headline.
* An idea of the content.
* A hint of the tone.

Make sure that your title clearly reflects the content of the article or story you are submitting but don’t agonize too much over it. No matter how closely you feel it reflects the magazine’s style, the editor may have other ideas. Alternatively, it may be that your carefully thought out heading simply won’t fit the space available and has to be cut down to size, so be prepared to be cruel on yourself. You should of course also enlist the help of an online editor who can help you with your manuscript, taking a huge weight off your shoulders.

About the Author

Nick Sanders is the owner and founder of www.Supaproofread.com, an online proofreading and editing services company, specialising in manuscript proofreading and editing services. You should visit them if you are looking for a book proofreader

Writing and Publishing My Book: Publishers and Publishing: Why We Still Need Them

“Publishing is a $30 billion industry that relies on one of the oldest and most basic of human creations, the word. If people initially used words to express simple ideas and feelings, they eventually sought more complicated means of preserving extended thoughts, transmitting them to other people, both near and far, and creating structures, such as laws, plays, and sonnets, that were aided by the ability to record, arrange, and store words for later use. Publishing has been a focal point of this human effort to preserve and distribute.

But now one hears of the death of publishing, that computers and the Internet are rendering obsolete publishing and publishing houses. After all, one can write an article or a book and post it online. Or for a small fee, anyone with a computer can format a book and get it printed digitally without a publisher.

What is indisputable is that publishing is undergoing an electronic revolution, much of which has improved quality and made the industry more efficient. Computers and the Internet have affected publishing more than many other industries because its basic product, the word, despite being ancient, is highly adaptable to modern technology.

Three areas in particular have changed in publishing. First, the production process, from editing to typesetting, has been computerized, making it easier to perform certain tasks while greatly reducing costs. Second, publishing has begun to abandon paper for certain works, creating entirely electronic or web-based products. This is especially seen in newspapers and reference books, but novels and books in other genres are increasingly being produced in electronic format. Finally, computers and the Internet have allowed for a new “distributed” workforce. If in the 1990s most work in publishing was still handled in-house, now manuscript preparation is increasingly done by individuals in their own offices or homes, connected to a publisher by phone and e-mail. In our own company we have abandoned the traditional office completely, operating out of a virtual office of electronic workspaces and webcams.

As newspapers are now experiencing, or as encyclopedias found out in the 1990s, there are real changes for publishing in the Internet era, and there’s no going back. The Internet, organized by search engines like Google, is a much less costly and more efficient way to organize and distribute information. It is also likely that the planet will be better off with fewer trees cut, with fewer stacks of old newspapers, and with less pollution caused by paper production.

So is publishing on its way out? It’s unlikely, at least in the foreseeable future, as publishers have long served as more than a middleman between writers and readers. Here are four important functions that publishers have in the Internet era.

Selection. The Internet can provide unlimited access, and search engines can help people find information, but the Internet and search engines can’t determine what’s good and what’s accurate, despite user-generated comments. People will likely still rely on publishers to identify their needs and interests and to select and create works that best meet them.

Preparation. Publishers do more than choose articles and books. They work with authors in organizing, reorganizing, and otherwise improving their text. They also edit and proofread the material and professionally format it into pages, whether on paper or on the Internet. Self-published works are rarely of the same quality as books put out by publishers.

Marketing. Even books sold in electronic format need to find readers. Publishers are in the business of selling books and other materials, and they know their markets. Books sold by publishers far outsell books self-published.

Professionalism. Although writers might be enticed by the possibilities and freedom of self-publishing, they are well served by an industry that maintains standards and provides support and infrastructure for their works. Newspaper publishers enforce journalistic, including ethical, standards that give readers confidence in their text. Reference book publishers ensure accuracy and authority of their works. General trade publishers help identify consumer needs and find books to satisfy them, as well as nurture and support authors who write books of literary merit.”

About the Author

Thomas Riggs & Co Thomas Riggs and Co is a book developer based in Missoula Montana. Thomas Riggs and Company is working within emerging technology that is driving the future of the publishing industry.

Writing and Publishing a Book – Step # 7

Step #  7 – Marketing and Promoting Your Book

You made it!!!  You are OFFICIALLY an AUTHOR!

By now, if you’ve followed these steps, your book is not only written, it’s listed for sale on Amazon.com!

Now the next step is to market and promote your book…

That’s a whole other subject that could take a multitude of posts to cover…

For now, let’s just stick to making sure you maximize your income potential by also signing up as an Amazon Affiliate/Associate at https://affiliate-program.amazon.com/

From there you not only gain royalties from CreateSpace and Amazon, you also get commission as an Amazon Associate.

There are SO many avenues available to you to promote your book – that I’m sure you can find online – and I won’t insult your intelligence by providing yet another list here…

What I will say is that if you are passionate about your book and would like our personal coaching, we would love to talk with you…

What you have to say MATTERS!

As Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “Don’t die with your music still inside you. Listen to your intuitive inner voice and find what passion stirs your soul.”

Contact me…

If you need more information or would like personal coaching, please feel free to contact me for a no-obligation consultation.